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Bookshelf

  • Debra Adelaide: Household Guide To Dying

    Debra Adelaide: Household Guide To Dying
    It's been a long time since I've posted a book but I really enjoyed this one. Easy to read, nice flow, not too much given so you have to keep thinking.

  • Ann Vanderhoof: The Spice Necklace: A Food-Lover's Caribbean Adventure

    Ann Vanderhoof: The Spice Necklace: A Food-Lover's Caribbean Adventure
    Although I've never been to any of the places visited in this book many things (markets, people, foods) were kind of familiar. I was reading this in Havana and had just read about guava berry liquor when we were offered Guyabita del Pinar! Read the stories and then make a few of the recipies.

  • Andy Goldsworthy: Passage

    Andy Goldsworthy: Passage
    I've always loved Andrew Goldsworthy's art. This book combines his beautiful photographs of his work, both temporary and permenant, with text from curators and a journal written as he worked. I prefered the journal. His thought process while working really made me look at the pieces differently. I really, really wish I could see the real deal instead of just photos.

  • A. Manette Ansay: Vinegar Hill (P.S.)

    A. Manette Ansay: Vinegar Hill (P.S.)
    I started this book as a "summer read" and in fact it was easy to read but the content was something else. The charactures are so well drawn that even though you dislike some of them you can understand them and where what they do comes from. I had sort of read a few pages each night but then I got three quarters of the way through and it became a race for the end. I couldn't put it down and read until four in the morning.

  • Azadeh Moaveni: Honeymoon in Tehran: Two Years of Love and Danger in Iran

    Azadeh Moaveni: Honeymoon in Tehran: Two Years of Love and Danger in Iran
    This book reminded me of the lessons learned while travelling. It's so easy to make assumptions and to mis-understand what's going on. It was interesting to hear what someone who sits on both sides of the fence thinks (and thinks about) but also how, once you're a parent your ideas take a monumental shift, you become a mother bear. This is a good read and was made all the better because it was my first e-book downloaded from the BC Library.

  • Ammon Shea: Reading the OED: One Man, One Year, 21,730 Pages

    Ammon Shea: Reading the OED: One Man, One Year, 21,730 Pages
    Can you imagin reading the Oxford English Dictionary? It only took Shea a year. He is more than a little obsessed with words and will tolerate almost anything to find new ones. He doesn't include pronunciation because most of the words he lists are archaic. Who the hell knows how they are pronounced, no one has used them for so long! One of my favourites is vesperate because it describes my favourite time of the day. "In 26 chapters filled with sharp wit, sheer delight, and a documentarian's keen eye, Shea shares his year inside the OED, delivering a hair-pulling, eye-crossing account of reading every word, and revealing the most obscure, hilarious, and wonderful gems he discovers along the way."

  • Lawrence Hill: The Book of Negroes (Canadian Edition)

    Lawrence Hill: The Book of Negroes (Canadian Edition)
    Abducted as an 11-year-old child from her village in West Africa and forced to walk for months to the sea in a coffle - a string of slaves - Aminata Diallo is sent to live as a slave in South Carolina. But years later, she forges her way to freedom, serving the British in the Revolutionary War and registering her name in the historic "Book of Negroes". This book, an actual document, provides a short but immensely revealing record of freed Loyalist slaves who requested permission to leave the US for resettlement in Nova Scotia, only to find that the haven they sought was steeped in an oppression all of its own. Aminata's eventual return to Sierra Leone - passing ships carrying thousands of slaves bound for America - is an engrossing account of an obscure but important chapter in history that saw 1,200 former slaves embark on a harrowing back-to-Africa odyssey.

  • Michael Chabon: The Yiddish Policemen's Union: A Novel

    Michael Chabon: The Yiddish Policemen's Union: A Novel
    Having read this one twice, which is unusual for me, I think I can recomend it strongly.

  • Sue Monk Kidd: The Secret Life of Bees

    Sue Monk Kidd: The Secret Life of Bees
    This is one of those books that is a slow starter but then when it's done you wished you had read it slower. I loved the writing in this book and I think every woman or woman/child should read it.

  • Francois Bizot: The Gate
    This book tells the story of the only Westerner to survive being arrested by the Khmer Rouge. It's clear and simple approach makes the story all the more horrific and having been in the very room at Tuol Sleng that he describes made it all the more powerful to me.

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